A Surprise while Reading T. H. Huxley

I have been reading an old copy of Results and Methods Essays by T. H. Huxley. Mostly because Aleister Crowley cited him once or twice. I have been interested in, and trying to understand, what Crowley has written for a long time. My thought was that perhaps Huxley could shed some light on his cryptic writing.

I knew little of T. H. Huxley other than he was an Englishman who died in 1895, about the time Crowley was 20. I was delighted to read his style and of his admiration for the works of Rene’ Descartes. It turns out that Huxley was a great thinker, an advocate of the scientific method and a Biologist.

The purpose of this post is to report that between pages 190 and 191, I found this artifact of early Los Angeles. A handbill announcing a Free Oahspean Lecture on Sunday April 1st at Blanchard Music Hall on Hill Street.

Office Lens_20170409_083056_processed

A you can see there is no year. On the obverse there was an unintelligible word preceding the word “molecule” with a shape on the left that could be a geometrical figure like a molecule. Interestingly, next to the geometrical shape there looked to be a 7 data points bounded by a curvilinear line.

Office Lens_20170408_065926_processed

This post is merely quaint. If there is any significance to the drawing perhaps someone will contact me for the original.

The Oahspean Bible is a huge volume of automatic writing published by the writer, John Ballou Newbrough (1828-1891) in 1882. Automatic writing has given us a whole lot of rubbish over the years. My take is that some is fraudulent, some may have been truly automatic (but as useful as one of my nightly dreams), and some may make sense to someone sometime. Neither of these assessments would be a reason to study it.

I do recommend Huxley but that is it.

Advertisements